One out of hundred dating show

Among all above Chinese variety TV shows, it seems that reality dating shows take the majority over others. It was my fav show back during my school days, lol, bring back memories. I hope thats the show you are talking about i hope.

Top 10 Chinese TV Shows

Your email address will not be published. Things You Need To Know. November 23, at 9: October 3, at 1: Zasher Fgg K says: September 28, at 9: Home Life and Love Real Life. Earlier this year year-old Melbourne-born Phoebe Lay found herself in Shanghai on a televised dating show called "One in a Hundred". Phoebe appeared in a special episode featuring Chinese people living in Australia.

This is her story: It all started with my mum. She was in a rush to find me a Chinese boyfriend after coming out of a relationship with a Westerner and being single for over a year.

The 100 Season 5 Episode 1 "Eden"

Every week my mum and grandma would ask about my dating life. They'd tell me not to be so picky and to keep going on dates. Then one day they caught wind of news a Chinese dating show was coming to Australia for auditions.


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Initially I was extremely reluctant, but after some serious convincing conceded to go to the Melbourne audition, just to meet new people. There the director sat me down and asked all these extremely personal questions: And I didn't know what they were going to do with my waistline. Another was, "what do you believe Chinese people expect in terms of financial responsibility between husband and wife? I added, probably because they don't want their husbands spending money on other women outside the marriage! They had a real laugh about that.

I didn't think I'd make it far, but they liked me because I had the Chinese mentality while still being very Westernised.

Top 10 Chinese TV Shows

Still, I was nervous. With no television experience and my Mandarin not up to scratch, how was I to fluently express myself? Not only that, I was to be the only Australian-born contestant. I remember arguing with my mum over pulling out of the show, even after my flights were booked and my short notice leave approved; there was no way of getting out of it. I was expecting the game show to be fair, where I would meet the male contestants on stage and we'd be judged by our feelings. But it was all pre-written.

The director had a meeting with us the day before the show and we had to submit our answers to a series of profile questions before taping. Judging by our profiles, each contestant had already selected their top three choices and the directors had these matches in mind. On stage, the other girls were really good at selling themselves and putting the guys on the spot; it felt like we were reporters at a press conference - before you knew it the mic would be snatched away from you.

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One of the girls asked the contestant, "While you were singing I noticed you winked at me. Was my beauty so dazzling it stung your eyes? And many of them were really serious about finding their soul mate. One of the girls, Rebecca, became the "princess" of the show. All the guys wanted to pick her. The show is very big in Shanghai. Every episode has a lot of crying and touching moments, but a lot of it's fake. For example, one of the girls said she'd made the contestant homemade dumplings, to show how much she liked him.

Pan Wang does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment. Republish our articles for free, online or in print, under Creative Commons licence. Compared with Western cultures, China has traditionally had a vastly different value system towards marriages and family.

But over the past 30 years, these customs have been upended. In many ways, dating shows became a powerful way to facilitate these changes. By looking at the development of Chinese television dating shows, we can see how love and marriage changed from a ritualized system mired in the past to the liberated, Western-style version we see today. Marriage matchmaking has always been an important cultural practice in China. Marriage was viewed as a contract between two households, and it was for the purpose of procreation, not love.

Thought to contribute to peace and stability, it was the dominant custom into the latter half of the 20th century.

However, even in the wake of political change and globalization, many families still held the traditional Chinese belief that women, unlike men, belonged in the home, and that their parents had the final say over whom they could marry. Certain traditions still ruled. The style of the show followed a linear pattern. It was essentially a singles ad broadcast before audience members, who, if interested, could contact the candidate for a date.

Despite all the limitations, the show was a groundbreaking depiction of courtship. It took decisions about love and marriage from the private home to the very public domain of broadcast TV. By the early s, Chinese TV networks found themselves in fierce competition with one another.